Cooking Preparation

Cooking is something many enjoy doing, some find it a task. Being organized in the kitchen can help greatly in the preparation involved in cooking. Whether you have a huge gourmet kitchen or a kitchenette, knowing how to keep it organized is a good place to start. Here are some tips; 1) Keep your utensils in a place located closely to the area in which you will prepare your food. Your cooking utensils would do well in a container or on hooks right at arms length to the stove, so having them handing will keep things running smoothly. 2) Spices, if you are one that adds your spices as you cook, keep them in either a spice caracole or a …

What do you really need in cookware and crockery

Cookware is always a rather contentious subject. I have seen chefs turn up to even the simplest of cooking jobs carrying more than it would take to maintain your average oil tanker (though maybe this is not the best use for your cookware), when all that was really needed was a knife and something to sharpen it with. So what are the real ”cookware essentials”, the things that you really can’t do without? Well surprisingly you actually need only a very small amount of things to get you going. Probably considerably less than you have already. All the cookware you actually need is a good knife, a means of sharpening it, a chopping board and a couple of pans. You …

Types Of Cookware: Pots And Pans

Pots and pans make the most essential part of your cookware. There are lots of various types available for each particular cooking method or a few different methods. Skillet/frying pan has a flat bottom with short sides that are flared or sloped, which makes it easier to toss and turn food with a spatula. The pan is usually made of a responsive to heat material such as lined copper, stainless steel with a copper or aluminum core, anodized aluminum or cast iron. Non-stick surface is also popular in such pans. They are available in different sizes and generally come with a cover. Roasting pan is usually of a rectangular shape with low sides allowing the heat from the oven to …

A Beginners Guide to Chinese Cookery

Introduction When I first ate Chinese food in the UK in the 1970s, it was really quite unappealing. Everything came in a gloopy sauce and seemed to taste the same, due to the overuse of monosodium glutamate, supposedly a flavour enhancer but in reality, nothing of the kind. Then in the 1980s a new breed of Chinese restaurant arrived (at least it took that long to reach the provinces) which provided lighter, tastier Chinese cooking demonstrating regional differences. There was one drawback, however, which was that this new type of restaurant was much more expensive than the original cheap ‘n tasteless ones. Consequently, I thought how nice it would be to cook Chinese food at home but I had no …